What makes Alaska special

A few readers have asked why I live in Alaska.  Well – this photo explains why.  Isn’t this mother grizzly beautiful?  How lucky am I to live in a place where animals like this grizzly bear still exist!  If you’ve read my blog, you probably gathered that I’m not too fond of the humans in Alaska.  But I am head over heels in love with “Alaska” – the non human part.  Alaska is the most beautiful place I’ve ever seen on the planet.  You can stroll down the street and stare at glaciers so big they punch you in the face.  I can glance out my window and see a bald eagle with a seven foot wing span, or a mother moose and her two fuzzy babies chomping on grass. 

I spend as much time as possible camping near grizzly bears in Katmai National Park – you can read my many, many stories about grizzlies and wolves on my website www.grizzlybay.org.  What breaks my heart nearly every single day, however, is that the Alaskan human culture is founded upon exploiting the natural world and wildlife, exploiting the very things that make Alaska so special.  Every industry in Alaska is about extracting something from the natural world – be it fish, oil, gold or timber or wolf hides.  My hope is for people to understand what it means to come from a culture that is founded upon the complete and total exploitation of the natural world.

Another reason I live here is I found Homer, Alaska which is the only town in the state I could imagine living in.  Homer is known for halibut fishing, hippies, and art.  It is quite an anomaly in Alaska -a liberal town that has very few dead animals on the walls.  Homer is a town in the most scenic location I’ve ever seen – on a bay with views of mountains and glaciers stretching as far as the eye can see.  Unfortunately when I first moved here I lived 20 miles outside Homer – you can read about the folks I met out there on this blog – which I think represent more of the typical Alaskan mentality. 

Please take my blog with a grain of salt and a dash of satire – of course not everyone in Alaska refuses to bathe or molests their children.  I’m talking about the predominant culture – not every single individual Alaskan.  Of course there are exceptions to the noisy, violent, stinky, stop sign shooting Alaskans I talk about on this blog.  But the predominant Alaskan culture remains one based on violence and exploitation of the natural world -you can’t deny that, and I’m trying to teach Americans that those roots produce a culture very different from the rest of the U.S.  The other thing that makes living here tolerable is the fact that there are so few people here.  There were twice as many people in the county I moved from in AZ than in the whole state of Alaska!  I absolutly love that, and how easy it is to escape humanity here in Alaska.

*photo copyright 2008 grizzlybay.org

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